Dear community tree devotees,

Many of us are entering the third month of sheltering-in-place. We are finding new ways to stay connected and are mastering our video conferencing skills. For those who love trees and are using ZOOM, we have created a few custom backgrounds for you. You can download them here. For information on how to use them, visit this link.

For some light relief, we put together this handy chart to help you discover your secret tree name.

We are hosting a webinar this month. Our Invest from the Ground Up program is working with WCISA, and West Coast Arborists on a project called ‘Cool Parks’ to bring 2,500 trees to California’s disadvantaged and low-income communities, host workshops, and engage residents to learn and care about the trees in their city. To continue our work on this project, we are taking our workshop online. You can find out more below, and register here.

Don’t forget. Our haiku promotion is still running. If you have some young tree huggers in your house, this year we have a prize category for youth. You have until the end of this month to get your entries in.

Upcoming online events

Have lunch with Matt Ritter and learn about trees


Join the WCISA for the final session of a 5 part webinar series on the Botany of Trees
that started on April 14, 2020

Tuesday May 12, 2020
11am – 12:30 pm

The final in a five part webinar series taught virtually by Dr. Ritter. Four more webinars will follow each Tuesday, same time. Each lecture is an hour long followed by 30 minutes of discussion, questions and answers. Students earn 1.0 CEU per session. Participate in one or all of the series. $20 per session for Members / $30 for Nonmembers.

Topic:

May 12th:
Reproduction, flower formation, fruit, and seeds

A Botanist, Author, and Professor, Matt’s work includes A Californian’s Guide to the Trees Among Us and California Plants A Guide to Our Iconic Flora. Learn more about Matt Ritter here.

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TREES ARE ESSENTIAL –
INTRODUCTION TO URBAN FORESTRY


Tuesday, May 26, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Calling all volunteers, students, and tree adopters! Come join our hour-long webinar about California’s urban forests and the benefits they provide. This webinar will provide an overview of the important role urban forests play in our communities and ways you can get involved! The webinar will consist of a presentation and a short outdoor experience video, followed by a Q&A.

Register here

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Urban Forestry Today: Detection of Internal Decay in Trees Using Tomography

Thu, May 14, 2020
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PDT

Webcast series from University of Massachusetts

Join Dr. Nicholas Brazee, Ext. Plant Pathologist, Univ. of Massachusetts, for the 5/14/20 ‘Urban Forestry Today’ noonhour (Eastern) webcast, as he discusses the use of sonic and electrical resistance tomography for the detection of decay in urban trees.

Attend live & receive Free ISA/MCA CEU’s by clicking here or by visiting
www.joinwebinar.com & entering: 587-288-603

Broadcast availability will be limited to the first 500 live attendees – first come, first served.

Obtain FREE CEU’s by viewing archived webcasts on the ‘Urban Forestry Today’ website.

Register here

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Announcing the 2020-2021
Science Fellowship cohort

The Los Angeles Center for Urban Natural Resources Sustainability Fellowship provides research and science-delivery opportunities for graduate students from a diversity of academic disciplines. Selected Fellows conduct projects that contribute to the core mission and vision. The LA Urban Center Executive Oversight Team is pleased to announce the selected 2020-2021 Science Fellowship cohort:

Stephanie Piper
University of California, Riverside
Research Topic Area:
Urban Tree Canopy & Air Quality

Christian Benitez
California State University, Los Angeles
Research Topic Area:
“Quantifying Bird Habitat Using LiDAR,” Urban Tree Canopy Biodiversity, Urban Tree Canopy and Green Infrastructure, Urban Tree Canopy and Environmental Justice

Corinne Bassett
University of British Columbia
Research Topic Area:
Urban Tree Canopy Change Analysis & Impacts of Development

Find out more about the LA Urban Center Fellowships here.

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LA Urban Center Urban Forest Equity Visiting Scholars Request for Proposals

The Los Angeles Center for Urban Natural Resources Sustainability (The LA Urban Center) operates through a partnership among the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Urban Ecosystems & Social Dynamics Program; the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, State & Private Forestry, Cooperative Forestry: Urban and Community Forestry; the City of Los Angeles, Department of Recreation & Parks, and City Plants, Cal Fire, CA Urban Forests Council, Tree People, Amigos de Los Rios, and others.

The LA Urban Center is soliciting proposals for one or two Visiting Scholar(s) to contribute toward urban forestry goals as defined in the Green New Deal. Scholars will analyze currently available plantable space and the potential for urban canopy expansion and prioritization through a public health and equity lens.

To submit proposal online click here. Please email Rachel O’Leary via rachel.oleary@lacity.org if you have any issues with submission or any questions regarding the process. You can also submit your application via email to Rachel directly.

For more information on the LA Urban Center, visit: http://laurbanresearchcenter.org/

Funding for this project is provided through a grant awarded to TreePeople by Accelerating Climate Resilience, a sponsored project of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors.

Proposals are due 9:00 am PST, May 26, 2020.

 

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Haiku Contest

Enter our Haiku contest!

A haiku is a short three-line poem that uses sensory language to capture a feeling or image. Developed by Japanese poets, haiku are often inspired by nature, a moment of beauty, or poignant experience.

Haikus follow a strict form: three lines, with a 5-7-5 syllable structure. That means the first line will have five syllables, the second line will have seven syllables, and the last line will have five syllables. A haiku does not have to rhyme or follow a certain rhythm as long as it adheres to the syllable count.

3rd Annual California Urban Forests Council Haiku Contest

THEME:

Serenitree – how trees lift our spirits and save our souls

RULES:

  • Limit of 3 entries per person
  • Please “keep it clean”
  • Deadline May 31 st
  • Enter using the form below
  • All entries become the property of CaUFC to use in future promotions

See past entries here

Enter Now

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