Nature in our Neighborhoods Conference August 23-24 in San Rafael, California.
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WEDNESDAY


August 23, 2017

THURSDAY


August 24, 2017

Wednesday, August 23, 2017


10.30 am

TOUR

The Marin County Civic Center is a national- and state-designated historic landmark. The last building designed by renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright, the building was completed after his death and are the only government buildings designed by the distinguished architect that were ever actually constructed. Wright’s ideal of organic architecture-a synthesis of buildings and landscape have inspired locally based artists and film makers. Take the behind the scenes tour of this masterpiece of modern architecture for access to otherwise, private areas.

We know that the good building is not the one that hurts the landscape, but is one that makes the landscape more beautiful than it was before that building was built. In Marin County you have one of the most beautiful landscapes I have seen, and I am proud to make the buildings of this County characteristic of the beauty of the County.

-Frank Lloyd Wright

12.00 noon

REGISTRATION

12.45 pm

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

1.00 pm – 4.30 pm

PASSING A LOCAL BOND:

HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE NEIGHBORS

Last fall the residents of the city and county of San Francisco voted in favor of a ballot measure that required the city maintain street trees. Join Dan Flanagan from Friends of the Urban Forest, who with Steve Harriman, Kevin O’Hara and Reed Addis will lead you through the steps to take in creating a local bond measure for trees. Limited places available.

DAN FLANAGAN
Executive Director, Friends of the Urban Forest
STEVE HARRIMAN
Public Works Operations and Maintenance Division Manager for the City of Ranch Cordova
KEVIN O’HARA
Vice President of Urban and Government Affairs, National Recreation and Park Association
REED ADDIS
Principal, Environmental and Energy Consulting

6.00 pm – 8.00 pm

TREE HUGGER’S SOIREE AND ANNUAL URBAN FORESTRY AWARDS

Join us for a great networking event hosted by our board and regional councils. Celebrate all the good things happening in urban forestry across California. It’s not too late to enter the awards. Click here for more information.

Thursday, August 24, 2017


8.00 am

REGISTRATION

Grab a coffee, network with your fellow delegates and visit our exhibitors.

 

8.15 am

WELCOME

 

8.30 am – 9.30 am

OPENING KEYNOTE

Green Cities, Clean Water

The confluence of urban strategies around water, trees, nature, social equity, jobs, education, crime, environmental justice and smart, integrated city systems is bringing a multitude of opportunities to leverage costs and produce co-benefits.

HOWARD M. NEUKRUG, P.E.
Principal, CASE Environmental LLC

9.30 am – 9.45 am

BREAK

9.45 am – 12 Noon

URBAN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

Urban Forest Research You Can Use

Updates on research concerning the state of California’s urban forests, evaluating climate-ready trees, selecting trees for rainfall interception and carbon storage and the new urban forest carbon registry.

DR. GREG McPHERSON
Research Forester with the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station located in Davis, CA

Invasive species, disease and the urban forest.

Polyphagous and Kuroshio shot hole borers (Euwallacea nr. fornicatus) are invasive ambrosia beetles that form symbioses with multiple fungal species, which together cause a disease called Fusarium Dieback on trees in urban and native forests in California. Since 2012, the number of reproductive hosts for PSHB has increased from 19 to 49, and includes 20 species that are native to California. The infestation has spread from a single county in 2012 to seven counties in 2017

DR. JOHN KABSHIMA & DR. AKIF ESKALEN
Plant Pathologists with UC Riverside

Temperature, Patterns & Planning for the Future

DR. IGOR LACÁN & DR. JOE McBRIDE 

12 Noon – 1.15 pm

NETWORKING LUNCH

TRACK 1

URBAN WILDLIFE AS A NATURAL RESOURCE

1.30 pm – 2.45 pm

Wildlife Best Management Practices in the Urban Forest

RYAN GILIPIN
Hortscience, Inc.

Celebrating Biodiversity – Lessons from the San Francisco’s Street Tree Inventory

A mild climate, a global population, and a bit of a maverick streak have sown the seeds of a wildly diverse street tree population in San Francisco. In this presentation, we’ll tour the highlights of San Francisco’s recent street tree inventory and explore some of the larger ecological, management, and cultural implications.

KELAINE RAVDIN
Urban Ecos

TRACK 2

KEY CHALLENGES FOR URBAN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

1.30 pm – 2.45 pm

San Francisco’s Urban Forestry Plan

JON SWAE
City & County of San Francisco

Sustainable Cities – California could become more akin to Arizona, what can we learn from these communities.

DON BESSLER
Public Works Director, City of Tempe, Arizona

2.45 pm – 3.00 pm

BREAK

3.00 pm – 3.45 pm

POINT/COUNTERPOINT DEBATE

Quantity or quality? Can urban forestry save the world? As urban forestry professionals working in challenging times and a warming climate, what is the best way forward? More trees, or better trees?

Moderated by DR. GREG McPHERSON 

Arguing in favor of “quality” HOWARD NEUKRUG & KEVIN JEFFERSON

Arguing in favor of “quantity”  JOHN MELVIN & KELAINE RAVDIN

3.45 pm – 4.30 pm

CLOSING KEYNOTE

We can’t be healthy in unhealthy environments, especially when we create them.

Dr. DICK JACKSON MD
Professor, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA

4.30 pm

CLOSING REMARKS & CEU’S

 

Note: In the event of unforeseen circumstances, the schedule may change.