WEDNESDAY


August 23, 2017

THURSDAY


August 24, 2017

Wednesday, August 23, 2017


10.30 am

TOUR

The Marin County Civic Center is a national- and state-designated historic landmark. The last building designed by renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright, the building was completed after his death and are the only government buildings designed by the distinguished architect that were ever actually constructed. Wright’s ideal of organic architecture-a synthesis of buildings and landscape have inspired locally based artists and film makers. Take the behind the scenes tour of this masterpiece of modern architecture for access to otherwise, private areas.

We know that the good building is not the one that hurts the landscape, but is one that makes the landscape more beautiful than it was before that building was built. In Marin County you have one of the most beautiful landscapes I have seen, and I am proud to make the buildings of this County characteristic of the beauty of the County.

-Frank Lloyd Wright

12.00 noon

REGISTRATION

12.45 pm

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

1.00 pm – 4.30 pm

Registrations are closed.

PASSING A LOCAL BOND:

HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE NEIGHBORS

Last fall the residents of the city and county of San Francisco voted in favor of a ballot measure that required the city maintain street trees. Join Dan Flanagan from Friends of the Urban Forest, who with Steve Harriman, Kevin O’Hara and Reed Addis will lead you through the steps to take in creating a local bond measure for trees. Limited places available.

DAN FLANAGAN
Executive Director, Friends of the Urban Forest
STEVE HARRIMAN
Public Works Operations and Maintenance Division Manager for the City of Rancho Cordova
KEVIN O’HARA
Vice President of Urban and Government Affairs, National Recreation and Park Association
REED ADDIS
Principal, Environmental and Energy Consulting

6.00 pm – 8.00 pm

TREE HUGGER’S SOIREE AND ANNUAL URBAN FORESTRY AWARDS

Join us for a great networking event hosted by our board and regional councils. Celebrate all the good things happening in urban forestry across California. It’s not too late to enter the awards. Click here for more information.

Thursday, August 24, 2017


8.00 am

REGISTRATION

Grab a coffee, network with your fellow delegates and visit our exhibitors.

 

8.15 am

WELCOME

 

8.30 am – 9.30 am

OPENING KEYNOTE

Green Cities, Clean Water

The confluence of urban strategies around water, trees, nature, social equity, jobs, education, crime, environmental justice and smart, integrated city systems is bringing a multitude of opportunities to leverage costs and produce co-benefits.

HOWARD M. NEUKRUG, P.E.
Principal, CASE Environmental LLC

9.30 am – 9.45 am

BREAK

9.45 am – 12 Noon

URBAN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

Urban Forest Research You Can Use

Updates on research concerning the state of California’s urban forests, evaluating climate-ready trees, selecting trees for rainfall interception and carbon storage and the new urban forest carbon registry.

DR. GREG McPHERSON
Research Forester with the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station located in Davis, CA

Invasive species, disease and the urban forest.

Polyphagous and Kuroshio shot hole borers (Euwallacea nr. fornicatus) are invasive ambrosia beetles that form symbioses with multiple fungal species, which together cause a disease called Fusarium Dieback on trees in urban and native forests in California. Since 2012, the number of reproductive hosts for PSHB has increased from 19 to 49, and includes 20 species that are native to California. The infestation has spread from a single county in 2012 to seven counties in 2017.

DR. JOHN KABASHIMA & DR. AKIF ESKALEN
Plant Pathologists with UC Riverside

The Impact of Climate Change on California Street Trees

The impact of California street trees was determined by comparing street tree populations in 16 paired California cities. The current street tree population of one member of each pair was compared to a city that currently has the project average maximum temperature for the first city. When trees common to the first city were not found in the second city an initial assumption was made that the warmer temperature might be responsible for the tree’s absence. In this case local arborists and published sources on the adaption of tree species to different climate regions in California were consulted to see if the absence might not be due to the higher temperature.

DR. JOE McBRIDE 

12 Noon – 1.15 pm

NETWORKING LUNCH

TRACK 1

URBAN WILDLIFE AS A NATURAL RESOURCE

1.30 pm – 2.45 pm

Wildlife BMPs for Tree Care

A group of arborists, biologists, and wildlife conservation advocates have been working on Best Management Practices for tree care in California pertaining to wildlife. These Best Management Practices cover laws pertaining to wildlife, how to avoid impacting wildlife and what tree care can enhance habitat for wildlife. Ryan will introduce these Best Management Practices, explain how to use them, and discuss wildlife in our urban forests.

RYAN GILIPIN
Hortscience, Inc.

Celebrating Biodiversity – Lessons from the San Francisco’s Street Tree Inventory

A mild climate, a global population, and a bit of a maverick streak have sown the seeds of a wildly diverse street tree population in San Francisco. In this presentation, we’ll tour the highlights of San Francisco’s recent street tree inventory and explore some of the larger ecological, management, and cultural implications.

KELAINE RAVDIN
Urban Ecos

TRACK 2

KEY CHALLENGES FOR URBAN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

1.30 pm – 2.45 pm

Partnering for Change: San Francisco’s Urban Forest Plan

San Francisco’s Urban Forest Plan provides a powerful example of how partnerships between City agencies, non-profit partners and political allies were leveraged to create a vision to fundamentally change the City’s approach to urban forest management. In November 2016, San Francisco voters approved a ballot measure setting aside $19M annually for tree maintenance and transferring responsibility for all 125,000 street trees to the City. The presentation will focus on the challenges and lessons learned during the development and current implementation of this bold vision to ensure the long-term sustainability of San Francisco’s urban forest.

JON SWAE
Urban Forest Plan Manager, San Francisco Planning Department

Sustainable Cities – Resiliency in the Desert

Arizona municipalities continue to be challenged in urban natural resource management and the need for generational thinking and generational planning is as critical today as it ever will be. Local officials have the ability to make that generational difference through the way we manage our city’s living and static infrastructure and the way we engage our residents in support of those efforts.

DON BESSLER
Public Works Director, City of Tempe, Arizona

2.45 pm – 3.00 pm

BREAK

3.00 pm – 3.45 pm

POINT/COUNTERPOINT DEBATE

Quantity or quality? Can urban forestry save the world? As urban forestry professionals working in challenging times and a warming climate, what is the best way forward? More trees, or better trees?

Moderated by DR. GREG McPHERSON 

Arguing in favor of “quality” HOWARD NEUKRUG & KEVIN JEFFERSON

Arguing in favor of “quantity”  JOHN MELVIN & KELAINE RAVDIN

3.45 pm – 4.30 pm

CLOSING KEYNOTE

Prescribing Nature for Health

Dr. Nooshin Razani talks about the healing power of nature as well as why it is her mission to prescribe time in nature as a way to treat health conditions.

Dr. Nooshin Razani has devoted her career to preserving natural spaces and improving human health through nature. She studied pediatrics and public health at the University of California at San Francisco and Harvard. She was trained as a Nature Champion by the National Environmental Education Fund & the US Bureau of Fish and Wildlife, and spent years working with the San Francisco Department of Public Health on a park prescription pilot. In 2012 she was a Senior Fellow at the Institute at the Golden Gate, a program of the National Parks. Since 2012, she has worked with East Bay Regional Parks District and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland (UBCHO) on finding ways nature can relieve stress in low-income communities, and recently completed a clinical trial evaluating their program SHINE (Stay Healthy In Nature Everyday). She currently directs the Center for Nature
and Health at UBCHO.

DR NOOSHIN RAZANI MD MPH
Director, Center for Nature and Health,
UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland

4.30 pm

CLOSING REMARKS & CEU’S

 

Note: In the event of unforeseen circumstances, the schedule may change.